What is the origin of names that end in ….lon and also …man or mann?

Question by : What is the origin of names that end in ….lon and also …man or mann?
I just want to know this. Also, and really I am serious. which ethnic group likes to eat tongue? As delicacy. Is that German? Or?

Best answer:

Answer by Cogito
I don’t know the first part of your question – but I’m in the UK, and eating ox-tongue like you would ham or chicken in a sandwich is quite common. You can get it anywhere.
I don’t like it – but loads of people do.

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2 thoughts on “What is the origin of names that end in ….lon and also …man or mann?”

  1. Surname easier then finding tongue. Hopefully what you desired.
    http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Mann “Recorded as Man, Mann and the patronymics Manns and Manson, this is an English surname. It has several possible origins. The first being from the pre 7th century Anglo-Saxon and Old German word “mann” meaning man, and probably used as a nickname for a fierce or strong person or for a man as for some reason, contrasted with a boy. Alternatively the source could be from the pre 7th century English personal name “Mann”, which was still in use in the 12th Century. Although the exact sense is not always clear, and varied by circumstances, it is generally accepted that the meaning ranges from friend, associate or foreman, to servant, but it also may be feudal and correspond to such a phrase as “homo Bainardi”, the man of Bainard, one who owed Bainard service of some sort. Another possible origin is from the French province of Maine, as in Johannes de Mann of Yorkshire in the Poll Tax rolls of 1379. Early examples of the surname recording from church records include Robert Mann who married Avis Hankel at St. George the Martyr, Canterbury in 1577, and Daniell Manns a witness at St James, Clerkenwell, in 1720. The first recorded spelling of the family name is believed to be that of William Man. This was dated 1185 in the register of the Knights Templar, for the county of Yorkshire, during the reign of King Henry 11nd of England, 1154 – 1189. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to “develop” often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.”

    http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/ion “This interesting surname is an English variant of the Hebrew name “Yochanan”, meaning “Jehovah has favoured (me with a son)”, or “may Jehovah favour (this child)”. The name was adopted into Latin as “Johannes”, and has enjoyed enormous popularity in Europe throughout the Christian era, being given in honour of St. John the Baptist, precursor of Christ, and of St. John the Evangelist, author of the fourth gospel, as well as others of the nearly one thousand saints of the name. The personal name was first recorded as “Johannes” in circa 1140, and the surname was first recorded in the late 13th Century (see below). The modern surname can be found recorded as John, Jon, Jone, Ion and Ionn, and the patronymics include Johns, Johnson, Jonson and Ions. Recordings from English Church Registers include: the marriage of Thomas Ion and Jenetam Dudding on April 5th 1558, at South Cave, Yorkshire; the marriage of Lancelet Ion and Agnes Parnell on November 19th 1571, at St. Dunstan in the East, London; and the marriage of Robert Ion and Mary Best on April 23rd 1696, at Kirk Ella, Yorkshire. The christening was recorded in London of John, son of John and Mary Ion, on October 31st 1751, at St. Luke’s, Old Street, Finsbury. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Richard Ion, which was dated 1273, in the “Hundred Rolls of Cambridgeshire”, during the reign of King Edward 1, known as “The Hammer of the Scots”, 1272 – 1307. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to “develop” often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.”
    Beef tongue – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beef_tongue
    For the ethnic group, see Enxet people. For the … The tongues of other animals, notably pigs and lambs, are also eaten, and are very similar to beef tongue.
    Offal – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Offal
    Some consider offal dishes, like pâté, to be highly delectable. …. In France, chitterlings sausage is regarded as a delicacy called andouillette. … Pork tongues are also eaten cold with bread and a vinaigrette with raw onions or some ….. Some ethnic groups have traditional dishes made from lungs (such as lungen stew).
    Norwegian cuisine – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norwegian_cuisine
    Most Norwegians eat three or four regular meals a day, usually consisting of a cold breakfast with coffee, a cold (usually packed) lunch at work and a …. A delicacy which is somewhat popular in Norway is torsketunger; cod’s tongue. … Fatty fish like herring and brisling are given the same treatment. ….. Ethnic and Religious.
    Blood as food – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood_as_food
    Varieties include drisheen, moronga, black pudding, blutwurst, blood tongue, kishka … The Igbo ethnic group of Nigeria has no explicit prohibitions against eating blood, … a soup with coagulated blood and sundae,

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